Civil Society Summit

The Civil Society Summit is a knowledge and networking event of civil society in India, gathering leaders from civil society to interact with each other and from different sectors on a long term basis. It is to organise a platform for frank, off the record, interaction with other pillars of the nation.

The premise
The Civil Society Summit will discuss the state of our republic in the years after we promised ‘to secure to all its citizens: JUSTICE, social, economic and political; LIBERTY of thought, expression, belief, faith and worship; EQUALITY of status and of opportunity; and to promote among them all FRATERNITY assuring the dignity of the individual and the unity and integrity of the Nation’.

The Republic Day is in some ways even more special than the independence day. The independence day (15 August) was selected by the British to be on the anniversary of the day they won World War II. R-Day (26 January) was chosen to commemorate the anniversary of the Purna Swaraj (total self-rule/ independence) day. Till the Republic Day the Monarch of England was the head of state. From the Republic Day, it was our president and we had our own constitution which promised equality, justice and fraternity—legally abolishing the caste system and ensuring universal adult franchise.

It is to bring together those who work for a strong, forward looking, people-centric community, to share experiences, discuss challenges and opportunities and vision together. It brings together those from diverse spheres for a synergy of ideas. It hopes to build relationships across boundaries, and be a platform for people-centric nation building.

The summit as a process and an event is to

  • Introspect by being a ‘safe space’ for free and frank discussions.
  • Inform civil society actors about the developments in knowledge, technology and best practice.
  • Inspire, by having living legends (senior social activist, and human rights defenders) interact with young leaders. This will facilitate intergenerational learning and mentoring.
  • Innovate by providing space and opportunity for diverse actors—from corporate sector, government, media, sports, medicine and the civil society—to interact, and find areas of synergy.
  • Impact by providing opportunity for sharing information on activities and synchronising them.

The history
The first civil society summit was on the occasion of the 60th anniversary of Indian independence for a celebration of continuing freedom struggles and to promote an independent Indian Civil Society Platform. It is a celebration of life, survival, resistance and of continuing struggles for freedom against increasing odds. It is a space for dissent, voicing issues, for celebrating difference and for ongoing freedom struggles. The Summit honours present day freedom fighters who have made significant contribution in promoting or defending the freedoms enshrined in our constitution and remember those who are no longer with us.

Summit I was a celebration by about 725 people from 75 organisations, networks and peoples movements from about 15 states of India and neighbouring countries at Ambedkar Bhavan, Bangalore from 24-26 August 2007. Summit II had about 630 people from over 50 organisations from 5 states, and 5 countries. It was from 24-26 January 2010. Summit III was 15—17 November 2012 and Summit IV is from 24-26 January 2014.

India at 60: Searching for freedom: The India Civil Society Summit

India at 60: Searching for freedom:
The India Civil Society Summit
24-26 August 2007, Ambedkar Bhavan, Bangalore

Registration Rs 5000 (non-residential)
Contact: office @ openspace. org. in
On 15 August 2007 India celebrates 60 years of freedom from British Rule. On the one hand, we claim superpower status as a nuclear weapons state and a nearly double digit economic growth. On the other hand, we have the dubious distinction of being at wrong side of the global rankings in maternal mortality, female infanticide and foeticide, deaths due to preventable disease, and other indicators of human development. Progress has been uneven—from developing world class technology and services to having the world’s largest number of poor and illiterate. For many, ‘freedom’ in its true sense is yet to dawn- their struggles continue.
The summit is a celebration of life, survival and resistance and of continuing struggles for freedom against increasing odds. Therefore, the summit will be a space for dissent and voicing issues, a space for celebrating difference and a space for ongoing freedom struggles. It will situate Civil Society and is its role within this context.
The summit is to bring together those who work for a strong, forward looking, people-centric India, to share experiences, discuss challenges and opportunities and create a broad vision together. It brings together those from diverse spheres for a synergy of ideas. It hopes to build relationships across boundaries, and be a platform for people-centric nation building.
Programme
24-26 August 2007
Over 75 distinguished speakers on the following topics… with ample time for interaction:

• Urbanisation
• Power as participation
• Diversity and Citizens Agendas
• Putting People in to partnerships
• Wealth Creation
• Media
• Earth friendly life
• Challenges in International Funding
• Corporate support of Civil Society Initiatives
• Democracy and Governance
• Inclusion and justice
• Beyond Boundaries, a People's SAARC

Valedictory: Honouring present day freedom fighters by felicitating them and remembering 60 Martyrs by name and a single toll of the bell.
There will be cultural programmes every night from 7-9.30pm.

If you think it is a great idea do let us know how would like to be part of this effort.

Please register, and ask others to register.

Summit 2010: Emerging spaces and challenges

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CSS 2010 Registration form.pdf29.91 KB

The Civil Society Summit

The Civil Society Summit is to celebrate continuing freedom struggles in India, and to recognise present day freedom fighters. It is a premier knowledge and networking event of civil society in India. Its primary goal is to to bring together leading thinkers and practitioners in development and human rights with their counterparts in different sectors to

  • Inform civil society actors about the developments in knowledge, cutting edge technology and tools.
  • Inspire , by having living legends interact with upcoming leaders.
  • Innovate by providing space and opportunity for diverse actors to interact, and find areas of synergy.
  • Coordinate by providing opportunity for sharing information on their activities.

It will be held in Bangalore, India from 24-26 January 2010

The central theme will be 'governance', revisiting our republic 60 years after we promised on 26 January 1950

'to secure to all its citizens:
JUSTICE, social, economic and political;
LIBERTY of thought, expression, belief, faith and worship;
EQUALITY of status and of opportunity;
and to promote among them all
FRATERNITY assuring the dignity of the individual and the unity and integrity of the Nation.
'

  1. Chief executives of organisations, national or state conveners of networks and those being groomed to be in leadership positions will benefit best from the summit.
  2. There needs to be a broad perspective and respect for different opinions since there will be leaders from different sectors--from politics, business and art to science, technology and human rights to theoreticians, practitioners and managers.
  3. All shades of opinion are welcome, provided human rights are respected.

Emails
registrations: pradeepesteves@gmail.com
enquiries: 60@openspace. org. in

Fee

  1. Individuals Rs 500
  2. Organisations Rs 5000
  3. State/regional networks Rs 15,000
  4. National Networks Rs 25,000
  5. Stalls Rs 5,000
  6. Stalls (commercial) Rs 25,000

24 January 2010 Challenges

0900 Registration
1000 Inauguration by Veerappa Moily, Hon. Minister for Law
1100 Panel 01: Challenges in Accessibility
1230 Panel 02: Challenges to Commons
1430 Panel 03: Constitutional Vacuum
1600 Panel 04: Governance and threats to Civil Society
1700 Panel 05: Decentralisation
1800-2000 Cultural evening

25 January 2010 Alternatives
0930 Panel 06: Peace Building
1100 Panel 07: Electoral Reforms
1230 Panel 08: Migration and labour
1430 Panel 09: Health, Education MDGs
1600 Panel 10: Partnerships, CSR, Fairtrade
1800-2000 Cultural evening

26 January 2010 Emerging Spaces
0930 Panel 11: Emerging constitutional spaces
1100 Panel 12: Children and Governance
1300 Panel 13: International relations and responsibility
1400 Book releases (CERI manifesto, Women and Panchayat Raj, Movement of India)
1500 Freedom fighter awards

1600-2000 Cultural evening

Suggested registration:
Individual = 500
Organisation = 5,000
State/Regional Networks = 15,000
National Networks = 25,000
Stalls = 5,000
Stalls (Commercial) = 25,000

Accommodation will be paid directly, but can be blocked/arranged

If you would like to take part in the design and planning of the programme, you could join css2009@yahoogroups.com

7aug:: report of CSS planning meeting

ERI and CSS 2009: Small group meeting ISI, 7 august
0 Context and Introduction
i Background
Following the meeting on 3 August 2009, it was decided to have a meeting of a smaller group to make a draft of the programme to be circulated for wider discussion.
Accordingly, the following met at ISI on 7 August:

1. AID Pushpa,
2. CERI Archana
3. Context India Pradeep
4. OpenSpace Anita, Edwin
5. REDS Raj
6. Sangama Akai,B. Kumar
7. Samara Sadeeq

ii The logic
The idea was to make the programmes of CERI and CSS into one integrated, logical flow. It was also felt that given the number of topics to be covered, we would need an extra day.

1. Accordingly, it would be a four day programme in total.
2. Day one and two (10,11 November) would be for CERI.
3. CSS would start at 6pm on 11 November, and go on till 4pm on 13 November.
4. CERI starts a day earlier, since Ambedkar Bhavan, the preferred venue for CSS is not available on Saturday so working backwards these are the feasible dates.
5. Day 3 (12 November) would be mainly to discuss ‘governance’ per se, following which specific instances/areas of governance would be taken up.
6. The sessions on media, information technology and climate change would be ‘half-sessions’ of 45 minutes each. This is both due to the technical nature of the subjects and the paucity of time.
7. Other sessions would be of about 90minutes. The first speaker would get about 5minutes, followed by others with 3minutes. So the presentations would take about 25-30minutes. 30minutes for discussions. A cultural programme of about 10-20minutes. There would be a 10minutes buffer.

iii Other considerations
We kept in mind the following while choosing the topics, and the suggested speakers. There is still some way to go in this! Some of the considerations will need to be ensured in the final programme.

1. A blend of ‘recognised’ and yet to be recognised.
2. At least one affected person in each panel (voice from the grassroots)
3. A mix of theoreticians (academics/intellec tuals) and practitioners (activists)
4. Geographical and representative distribution of speakers.

iv The feedback
The framework is given for feedback. Please remember that it is the first draft. Going by experience, in css2007 the first draft changed about 60-70% depending on the availability of the speakers and the interests of the organisers. So please give your feedback which would make the summit rich with combined experience and wider ownership.
Please feel free to suggest

1. Another framework, if you very much disagree or have a different idea to widen ownership and relevance.
2. Topics which were left out.
3. Better clustering of sessions and topics.
4. Speakers and Moderators
5. Present day freedom fighters to be honoured.
6. Names of comrades who have passed away, to be remembered.

1 Inaugural (Keynote) (6pm, 11 November)
This would be followed by the recognition and honouring of present day freedom fighters. There will be freedom songs/concert/ cultural programme.

2 Changing faces of democracy (9am, 12 November)
i Militarisation
ii Dissent
Speakers from: Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Nepal, Tibet, Burma, Pakistan

3 Citizenship and the state (Who is a citizen?)

4 Governance through repression

5 Land, displacement and governance

6 Electoral systems, reforms and governance

7 Indigenous governance

8 Women and governance (13 November)

9 Health

10 Agriculture and food security

11 Media and communication

12 IT

13 Climate change

14 Concluding rally (4pm on 13Nov)
A rally from Ambedkar Bhavan to Vidhan Soudha carrying pictures of the freedom fighters would be an appropriate way to end the summit. We could involve more groups (environment/ cycling club) that work on rights issues.

Accomodation

Please arrange your accommodation directly. The following is an indicative (not exhaustive) list.

1. NavaSpoorthi Kendra (NSK)
Beside Holy Ghost Church, Davis Road.
St.Thomas Town Post, Bangalore-5600084.
Ph No: 25498010/20
Family Room (for 4 persons) Rs 700/-
Single Room 250/-
Contact: Sr Sushila 080-25498010

2. Holy Cross Centre Sisters Hostel
28, Millton Street, Near Don Bosco Provincial House,
Cooke Town, Near ITC Bus Stop,
Bangalore-560005, Ph no: 25468839
Rs 150 per person (36 beds available)
Single and Double Bedded rooms
Contact: 080-25468839

3. Vidyadeep, CRI Brothers Institution
Vidyadeep College 128/1, Ulsoor Road,
Bangalore-42.Ph No: 080-25587965
Sharing rooms (2 persons in a room)
12 x 2= 24beds
Per person with food Rs.400/-
Per person without food Rs.300/-
Contact: Ms Geetha 080-25587965

4. Don Bosco Provincial House
14, Milton Street, Cooke Town,
Bangalore-560005.Ph no: 25494758
4 Double Rooms (2 persons per room) - Rs 400 per room, Rs 200 per person
2 Single Rooms (single person) - Rs 300 per room/person
Dormitory 36 beds Rs 125 per bed/per person
Contact: Fr.Davis. 080 - 25462492

5. Indian Social Institute (ISI)
# 24, Benson Town Road, Benson Town.
Bangalore-46.
Tel: 23536189, 23525960, 23636700

6. Youth Hostel, Bangalore
#65/2, Millers Road, Benson Town Post,
Bangalore-46. Phone: 080 23540849, 25924040,259240849
Non Ac 2 bed - Rs 400/-
Ac 2 bed - Rs 500/-
Non Ac dormitory Rs 125/per person/bed
Dormitory Male (34 beds)
Dormitory Female (30 beds)
Contact: M.Chandrashekar 9449816139

organisers

1. Arka Mukhopadhyay
2. ASC (Adivasi Solidarity Council)
3. ACF (Anti Corruption Forum)
4. ANANYA–Global Concerns India
5. BOSCO (Bangalore Oniyavara Seva Coota)
6. BUP (Bangiya Unnayan Parishad)
7. Booshakthi Kendra
8. Booshakthi Vedike
9. Borok People's Human Rights Organisation
10. CED (Centre for Education and Documentation)
11. CDR (Centre for Dalit Rights)
12. CfAR (Centre for Advocacy and Research)
13. CERI (Campaign for Electoral Reforms India)
14. CIEDS
15. CIS (Centre for Internet and Society)
16. Context India
17. COT–NCCI (Council on Tribals–National Council of Churches India)
18. COVA (Confederation of Voluntary Agencies)
19. CWC (The Concerned for Working Children)
20. Delhi Forum
21. DSS (Dalit Shree Shakti)
22. FES (Foundation for Ecological Security)
23. Human Rights Alert
24. INSAF (Indian National Social Action Forum)
25. ISI (Indian Social Institute)
26. iQuest
27. Karnataka Dalita Mahila Vedike
28. LesBiT
29. MetaCulture
30. Mithra Foundation
31. Moving Republic
32. Maraa
33. NAC–DIP (National Advocacy Council for Development of Indigenous People)
34. NAPM (National Alliance of People’s Movements)
35. NCDHR (National Campaign for Dalit Human Rights)
36. ODAF (Orissa Development Action Forum)
37. OpenSpace
38. PSA (Programme for Social Action)
39. Pushpa Achanta
40. REDS (Rural Education and Development Society)
41. Saadya
42. SADED (South Asia Dialogues on Ecological Democracy)
43. SAHAYI
44. Samarthanam Trust for the Disabled
45. Sanchaya Nele
46. Sangama
47. Sakshi Human Rights Watch AP
48. SCMI (Student Christian Movement of India)
49. Disabled
50. SICHREM (South India Cell for Human Rights Education and Monitoring)
51. St.Joseph’s College of Arts & Science
52. Support
53. UTC (United Theological College)
54. URC (Urban Research Centre)
55. Vigil India
56. Visual Search
57. WHAD (Women Health And Development)

Summit 2012: Celebrating Civil Society Solidarity

THE CIVIL SOCIETY SUMMIT
CELEBRATING CIVIL SOCIETY SOLIDARITY
15—17 November 2012
Indian Social Institute, 24 Benson Road, Benson Town, Bangalore

In the context of decreasing space for citizens, citizens initiatives and the increasing militarisation of society, where violence becomes the first and most preferred response of the state, institutions, and individuals, it is time to demonstrate that there is a better way in a joint celebration by the various efforts of today—of peoples movements, civil society organisations and of communities—together in celebration, in the firm belief that opportunities for sharing bring out the best in people and communities.

The freedom struggle is not over on the midnight of 14 August 1947. The struggle for freedom from hunger, poverty, discrimination and oppression is still going on. For more than 70% of our population this freedom struggle is a real challenge. It will include those who want to demonstrate their solidarity with the struggle of the masses, and those who are part of the struggle for freedom. We want to proclaim that such people are truly freedom fighters of today. This summit will honour such freedom fighters.

The civil society summit is a self-organised, knowledge and networking event of civil society in India. Its primary goal is to bring together leading thinkers and practitioners in development and human rights with their counterparts in different sectors. We will celebrate our unity and strength in a series of round table discussions, cultural programmes and plenaries.

Inspired by the success of two civil society summits is this third initiative to celebrate solidarity, share knowledge, and honour present day freedom fighters in this event, that will include all those who will come to build their solidarity with each other and strengthen the struggle for freedom.

This civil society summit belongs to the people in more than one sense. It is a summit where the people who gather will share their resources. They will have an opportunity to share their experience, insights, and ideas. They will share their freedom struggle with the people gathered. The summit members will be encouraged to contribute to the expenses of the summit, but to ensure that the summit belongs to all and all experience a sense of ownership and equality there will be an upper limit for the contribution from individuals and institutions. Those unable to financially contribute will not be less honourable members of the summit.

Given the nature of the Summit ‘everyone is an organiser’. Everyone can contribute their energy and volunteer to share the different responsibilities. These decisions are taken in the preparatory meetings and the summit egroup in a participatory manner.

CEOs, national or state conveners of networks and those being groomed to be in leadership positions will benefit best from the summit.

There needs to be a broad perspective and respect for different opinions since there will be leaders from different sectors--from politics, business and art to science, technology and human rights to theoreticians, practitioners and managers.

All shades of opinion are welcome, provided human rights are respected.

Emails
registrations: pradeepesteves@gmail.com
enquiries: apushpa@yahoo.com

REGISTRATION: While the summit is an open event, participation is by prior registration only due to logistics reasons.
DEADLINE: 9 November 2012, but the earlier the better.

To ensure that money is not a barrier to participation, there is no registration fees. However, if you would like to contribute, this is the MAXimum contribution possible:
Individuals Rs 1000
Organisations Rs 10,000
State/regional networks Rs 15,000
National Networks Rs 25,000
Stalls Rs 5,000

Boarding and accommodation will need to be paid directly, but can be blocked / arranged.
To take part in the design and planning of the programme, please join the organising egroup by sending a mail to css2012-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

Programme schedule
15 November 2012
1400 Registration
1600 Inaugural
- Civil society and peoples movements
- Civil society and national development
- Civil society in a multi-cultural, multi-religious society
1900 Informal get-togethers, networking and sharing

16 November 2012
0900 Registration
0930 Conversation 1 Civil Society, Governance and rule of law
1100 Conversation 2 Civil Society and National Security
1230 lunch
1400 Conversation 3 Civil society , energy security and climate change- Veena
1500 Conversation 4 Civil society and cultural action, dissent and freedom of expression- Guru Kiran , Akkai Padmashali
1600 Conversation 5 Civil society and media / information technology / communication
1730 Conversation 6 Civil Society and Engagement with Corporate Sector and Markets
1900 Informal get-togethers, networking and sharing

17 November 2012
0930 Conversation 7 Child sensitive, responsive, accountable governance
1100 Conversation 8 Youth leadership for social justice
1230 Lunch
1400 Valedictory
1400 Solidarity presentations
1430 India and the world
1500 Awards (Young Achievers, Freedom Fighters)
1545 Remembrances
1615 Declaration
1645 Song and Pledge
1700 Close

Summit 2014: Finding common cause

In the light of the fast changing external environment, there is a need for CSOs to come together to collectively address, and lobby for, common issues of importance to their purpose, direction and functioning.

The absence of an effective state and national level body to make the CSO voice heard and the CSO perspective visible has led to many misconceptions not only among the general public and mass media, but also in the highest levels of government that is increasingly crafting draconian laws to curtail the functioning of the entire sector.

There is a need for state and national level permanent platforms of human rights and development organisations, working for social justice and committed to good governance both in society and in internal functioning. It will enable collective institutional, long-term engagement with the government, business, media and other institutions of society.

It will be inclusive and as broad based as possible--with district, state and national chapters, thematic and sectoral representation and one that CSOs regardless of size can identify with.

Consultations have been held in Delhi, Ranchi, Bhubaneshwar, Guwahati and Lucknow to good response. The idea has grown from periodic 'Civil Society Summits' in 2007, 2010 and 2012 to a growing realisation for the need to streamline the initiative better. It will be inclusive and as broad based as possible--with district, state and national chapters, thematic and sectoral representation and one that CSOs regardless of size can identify with.

The national launch will be
from 24 to 26 January 2014
at Bangalore, India

Decision makers / CEOs will benefit best.

There will be space for thematic and geographic network meetings during the summit to expand/deepen networks and to tell others about the work you do. Participants are encouraged to make use of the opportunity of having many organisations present to have full network meetings before or after the summit. The morning and afternoon of 24 January 2014 can also be used for network/thematic meetings.

Registration fee (Covers attendance for all sessions and lunch) [why is it so high?].
(a) International/national organisations and networks: Rs 200,000.
International organisations can nominate CEOs of all partners. National networks/organisations can mandate all state convenors in addition to the national covenor and CEOs of member organisations.

(b) State networks/campaigns and organisations: Rs 25,000
State networks/organisations can delegate all district convenors in addition to the state covenor and CEOs of member organisations.

(c) Individual organisations: Rs 5,000. Includes stay at venue
Individual organisations can nominate the CEO and one senior person.

While the summit itself is open to all, prior registration is required.
Registrations close on 20 January 2013.
Please confirm your participation to Pradeep Esteves at 2014Summit@gmail.com

If you are interested in attending and the registration fee is the only constraint, do let us know.

Some more information and answers to frequently asked questions:

Organisers

  1. ANANYA–Global Concerns India
  2. APD (The Association of People with Disability)
  3. BIRSA (Bindrai Institute for Research Study and Action)
  4. CED (Centre for Education and Documentation)
  5. CfAR (Centre for Advocacy and Research)
  6. CIEDS
  7. CIVIC
  8. CIVIDEP
  9. CSFHR (Civil Society Forum on Human Rights)
  10. Context India
  11. DA3 (Dalit Ardhik Adhikar Andolan)
  12. DSS (Dalit Shree Shakti)
  13. Fourthwave Foundation
  14. INSA
  15. INSAF (Indian National Social Action Forum)
  16. ISI (Indian Social Institute)
  17. JIF (Jharkhand Intellectuals Forum)
  18. Karaavirs
  19. KDMV (Karnataka Dalita Mahila Vedike)
  20. KSMF (Karnataka Sexual Minorities Forum)
  21. Mithra Foundation
  22. Moving Republic
  23. NAC–DIP (National Advocacy Council for Development of Indigenous People)
  24. NACDOR (NAtional Confederation of Dalit Organisations)
  25. NASC (National Adivasi Solidarity Council)
  26. ODAF (Orissa Development Action Forum)
  27. OpenSpace
  28. Parivathana
  29. Praxis
  30. Praxis Institute of Participatory Studies
  31. PSA (Programme for Social Action)
  32. Radio Active
  33. REACH
  34. Right to Sanitation Campaign (India)
  35. Saadya
  36. Samvad
  37. Sanchaya Nele
  38. Sangama
  39. SPAD
  40. Spoorthy
  41. SVYM (Swami Vivekananda Youth Movement)

Schedule

24 January 2014
Pre Summit Events
10am to 4pm Film Festival
11am to 4pm Karnataka consultation
-2pm to 4pm Consultation on Forest Rights

1630 Inaugural
Active citizenship and civil society in a secular democratic republic
Civil society and peoples’ movement leaders
1900 Close

25 January 2014: Finding common cause
Key challenges facing civil society today and our response (Institutional response)

0900 Movie
0930 The rationale and the challenges of inclusion (lessons from previous attempts)
1100 State-wise discussion (Key objectives, membership criteria and fees, organisational structure and sustainability)
1230 Lunch
1330 Thematic keynotes (10 minutes each)
1530 The national body (key objectives, membership criteria and fees, organisational structure and sustainability)
1800 Close

26 January 2014: Celebrating solidarity and engagement
0900 Movie
0930 Engaging with government: SCSP and TSP
1030 Engaging with Industry: CSR and CSOs: Expectations and pitfalls
1230 Lunch
1330 Pledge
1345 The citizen and the state (Films and discussion)
1700 Close

Thematic keynotes
Those working on these themes will detail what they expect from the national platform
Adivasi rights
Bonded labour, modern slavery
Child labour
FRA, PESA and its implementation
Land and forest rights
Public health and sanitation
Rural livelihoods
Sexual minorities
Sex work
Social exclusion
Water

Film Festival: Curated by Amudhan R.P.
10am to 4pm on Friday.
Within the programme on Saturday.
Close of programme (2-5pm) on Sunday.
Filmmakers Sushma Veerappa, Sunandha Bhat, Padmalata Ravi and Amudhan R.P. will take part in the post screening discussions.
amudhan.rp@gmail.com
86952 79353
The full programme can be accessed here

Schedule: Film Festival

Civil Society Summit Film Festival: Schedule
Curated by Amudhan R.P.

24 Jan 2014
10:00 Don’t be our fathers
Dir: Rupesh Kumar; 30 mins; Malayalam; 2013; India
Don’t be our fathers, the documentary is an attempt to capture the lives of the people of Peringeel, a predominanly dalit village, in Kannoor district Kerala. It tries to explore how the people in Peringeel determine their own life in the contemporary world confronting the patronizing efforts of the dominant political parties and communities.

10:45 When Shankar Nag comes asking
Dir: Sushma Veerappa: 66:45: Documentary: Kannada: 2013: India
The twist in Bangalore’s tale is Shankar Nag. No other city has an actor who died more than 20 years ago, still breathing through autorickshaw windshields. WHEN SHANKAR NAG COMES ASKING unfolds today’s Bangalore. In the race to become a ‘global’ city, the struggle is as much in holding on to the familiar as it is about embracing the new. In what ways does one seek the familiar, when the familiar is not the same anymore?

12:15 Pee (Shit)
Dir: Amudhan R.P.; 26 min; Tamil with English subtitles; 2003: India
Mariyammal, a sanitary worker with Madurai Municipal Corporation shares her frustration and anger with the filmmaker while cleaning a street near by a temple in Madurai which is full of shit.

14:00 FABRICATED!
Dir: K.P. Sasi; 94 min; Malayalam, English, 2012
This is a story of the post Independent India. Every year when this country celebrates freedom, there are thousands of innocent prisoners in Indian jails, waiting for justice without even a trial. Abdul Nasar Maudany is one such victim. As a Muslim spiritual leader, he reacted strongly against the demolition of Babari Masjid in 1992. His house was attacked and he spent nine and a half years in jail. All the charges against him were proven false and even the judgement makes it clear that the case was fabricated. He was released without any compensation. No trial on those who were responsible for such fabrication was conducted. But soon, Maudany was framed for another series of charges and he is still waiting for justice in Bangalore Parappana Agrahara jail.

15:45 Good girls don’t Dance
Dir: Padmalatha Ravi: 14mins 29sec: Documentary: English, Kannada, Tamil and hindi: 2013: India
This is a documentary that questions the notions that shape the society's reaction to sexual harassment, molestation and rape. It tries to understand the notion of good girls and bad girls that forms the basis for this reaction. The film uses interview format.

26 Jan 2014

14:00 Ningal Aranaye Kando? (Have you seen the arena?)
Dir: Sunandha Bhat; 73mins; Malayalam; 2012; India
A woman’s concern over the disappearance of medicinal plants from the forest, a farmer’s commitment to growing traditional varieties of rice organically and a cash crop cultivator’s struggle to survive amidst farmers’ suicides, offer fresh insights into shifting relations between people, knowledge systems and environment.

15:30 Farooq versus The State
Dir: Anjali Montero and K.P. Jayasankar: 25mins: Documentary: Hindi, English; 2012: India
Hari Masjid, Wadala, Mumbai, was the scene of a brutal police attack on January 10, 1993. Though Farooq Mhapkar was one of the casualties of indiscriminate police firing, he was charged as a rioter. Farooq versus The State is the story of Farooq's protracted legal battle against an unyielding State in pursuit of justice. Through this case, the film seeks to explore how justice was delayed and denied to the victims and survivors of the 1992-93 communal violence.

16:00 Constitution
Dir: Gauhar Raza; 15 min; Hindi with English subtitles; 2010
The documentary looks at the blatant violations of the Constitution of India, particularly fundamental rights by the State and political parties. The film calls for reclaiming the constitution.

Curated by Amudhan R.P.
amudhan.rp@gmail.com
86952 79353

Filmmakers Sushma Veerappa, Sunandha Bhat, Padmalata Ravi and Amudhan R.P. will take part in the post screening discussions.

What will the proposed platform be like?

It is still to evolve, but the following principles will be followed. It will certainly be inclusive and bottom up thereby ensuring that there is coherence, internal democracy, and full space for the local genius. The terms and other conditions would need to be evolved collectively. However, they would be democratic and widen the leadership pool so that the responsibility of expanding the initiative does not fall on one person or organisation for too long.

We hope to have at least one member in each taluk/block within the next five years--that would mean about 6000 annual fee paying member organisations, which is a very small percentage of the registered organisations in the country. However, we will be doing some purposive networking, and getting other geographic and thematic networks on board.

Initially the task is to identify state anchors, whose primary responsibility is to identify district anchors in all the districts of the state within a year. These district anchors in turn, will identify taluk anchors. The taluk anchors would ensure that all the organisations in the taluk/block become part of the network within a year.

A similar process could be followed for both the geographic and thematic organisations.

As of 4 January 2014 (at the end of the Karnataka state summit), these are some of the thoughts:

I Name

  1. The name will be Civil Society Coalition (CSC).
  2. Each state can prefix or suffix the name of the state (eg: CSC-Karnataka).
  3. The name will be the same across languages.
  4. At the national level it will be Federation of CSCs.

II Membership

  1. Membership is restricted to (registered) organisations (under Societies Registration Act, Trusts Act, Sec 25 Companies Act)
  2. Organisations whose board members are office bearers of a political party or on the board of a company are not eligible (subject to condition below).
  3. A 'membership committee' will consider requests of organisations coming under 'b' and decide on a case by case basis.

III Membership fee Membership fee will be annual and budget linked.

  1. Total budget less than Rs 10,00,000 (10 Lakhs per annum) Membership fee Rs 500.
  2. Total budget Rs 10-50 lakhs Annual membership fee Rs 1000.
  3. Total budget Rs 50 lakhs to 1 Crore Annual membership fee Rs 5000.
  4. Total budget above Rs 1 Crore Annual membership fee Rs 10,000.

IV Participation (desirable, to evolve)

  1. A decision maker with the requisite mandate should represent the organisation.
  2. The same member from an organisation represent it at the Coalition.

V Sustainability and funding

  1. Norms need to be developed so that there is no dependency on any one donor.
  2. Membership fees should always form a substantial part of the organisational budget to promote ownership, engagement and accountability.
  3. Raising own resources should be a priority.
  4. Should lobby with the government for fixed, untied, long-term support with the clear understanding that our position on critical engagement will remain.
  5. The source of funding should at no time constrain us from speaking out of particular organization, including the government.

VI Norms and standards

  1. The coalition will evolve norms and standards for its members that match or exceed statutory norms.
  2. All members will be assisted (through internal capacity building and other processes) to meet these norms and standards. An enable them to grow their intuitions to pursue their mission.
  3. Multiple indices will track the progress towards meeting the norms and standards (financial, staff welfare, sustainability, inclusion, diversity etc)
  4. Collective mechanisms for adherence will be put in place. (For instance if the organisation is too small to have a committee against sexual harassment, one can be set up collectively. Similarly for staff welfare, fund-raising etc).
  5. Promote the culture of sharing of the ‘best practices of development’ for the growth the development sector, evolve norms that are unique to the development sector, and collectively work to influence system to adopt them.
  6. Unite for the common cause of the sector.

Who are the 'freedom fighters' and 'young achievers'?

We acknowledge the many ongoing freedom struggles in India today. History did not stop on 15 August 1947 as the official history books would have us believe--with neat classification of those who worked for human rights before that magic date being termed 'freedom fighters' and those who do so afterwards as 'activists' 'social workers' or even 'maoists' 'naxalites' and the more recent 'terrorist' (think Binayak Sen, Soni Sori, the innumerable 'encounter' deaths...).

The summit honours and gives a token of affection to a few freedom fighters and young achievers.

Freedom fighters
Those who work to make the fundamental rights a reality for the most deprived sections we call freedom fighters. The criteria for this is simple. They should have worked to advance the fundamental rights without negating any other fundamental right, be over 60 years of age and not have got any state, national or international award.

Young achievers
Young achievers are those below the age of 35, but have contributed substantially to make the fundamental rights a reality for the most deprived sections. The criteria for this is simple. They should have worked to advance the fundamental rights without negating any other fundamental right, and not have got any state, national or international award.

Why is the registration fee so high?

We are often asked why the registration fee is 'so high', when the summit itself is run on a no-profit no-loss 'shared cost' basis and is quite spartan.

Let us first reiterate the commitment made at the first summit way back in 2007: Money will not be a barrier for anyone to participate in the summit and mentioned this time too if you are interested in attending and the registration fee is the only constraint, do let us know.

The registration fee (for all the three days) is Rs 100 per person (non-residential) and Rs 2500 per person (residential).

This is how the break up goes:
India has 5564 (or is it 6071?) Taluks/blocks in 640 districts in 28 States and 7 Union Territories. We assume (and encourage)

  • International/national organisations and networks (Rs 200,000) will have member organisations from at least 2000 taluks.
  • State networks/campaigns and organisations (Rs 25,000) will have about 250 member organisations in a state (membership density is higher the more local the network is).

These networks would normally stay together at a venue of their choice. So the registration fee (Rs 100 per person for all the three days) covers the lunch for three days.

If however, an individual organisation wants to register separately, then the CEO and one senior person are registered. The fee then works out to a little over Rs 600 per person per day (Rs 5000). This fee includes board and lodge for four days, since most people stay that long (come a day earlier/leave a day later due to travel connexions/other work/sightseeing in Namma Bengaluru).

The fee is to encourage state and block level processes, so that the initiative is rooted (there is no 'discount' for organisations registering individually but not staying at the venue) ... but actually would work out the same either way.

But yes, we do want CSOs to think big (and encourage Purposive Networking). So if an organisation or network claims to be a 'national' network, we would expect it to have membership from at least a third of the taluks/blocks. But if a 'national network' is only five organisations working in 10 states, and wants to save money, we suggest that it registers as five separate organisations or join other state/national organisations. Choose the level most appropriate for you and register accordingly.

If you still think that our registration fees are too high, do let us know how we can reduce it by sending a mail to 2014Summit@gmail.com. This is a small (micro!) initiative, and we welcome suggestions to be better.